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River East Transcona School Division
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Safety Committee Team Member Handbook

 Abstract

Joint safety committee members need a reference to refer to regarding their roles and responsibilities as committee members. This safe operating procedure provides guidelines and best practices for committee members.

 

 Summary



 Safe Operating Procedure Controlled Document

OVERVIEW

​This safe operating procedure is a guideline document for RETSD safety committee members and representatives.


KEY LINKS




KEY COMPLIANCE INDICATORS

  • RETSD has provided safety committee remembers a handbook to help support them in their work as a safety committee member in our school division.

DOCUMENT NUMBER

 

WSHMS-01-SOP-001-05

 

PURPOSE


To establish divisional expectations and standards regarding safety committee member roles, responsibilities

 

SCOPE


This safe operating procedure applies to all RETSD worksites. All worksites have a site safety team. All worksites are covered by the Divisional safety and Health Committee.

 

RESPONSIBILITY


By Facility

This handbook applies at all RETSD worksites.


By Stakeholder

This handbook applies to all RETSD workers who serve as safety representatives in the workplace.

 

SAFETY COMMITTEE PURPOSE


Manitoba's approach to workplace safety and health legislation stems from the philosophy that responsibility for workplace safety and health is shared in the workplace. The Workplace Safety and Health Act (called the Act) and Regulations (called the regulations) set out a structure for this internal responsibility system (called the IRS).

 

Workplace safety and health committees (called committees) are required in workplaces with twenty or more workers, unless a variance structure is approved by the Director. RETSD operates committees under a variance structure, which will be explained in greater detail.

 

Worker safety and health representatives (representatives) are required in workplaces with between ten and nineteen workers which RETSD has in place.

 

Committees and representatives are the primary mechanisms for employers and workers to work together in identifying and resolving safety and health concerns. Experience with committees has proven they reduce injuries and illnesses in the workplace.

 

A committee helps the employer and workers to improve safety and health in the workplace by helping to identify and resolve concerns.

 

This is done, in part, by:

  • Helping the employer identify, assess and control hazards

  • Providing a formal channel of communication between the employer and workers

  • Conducting regular inspections

  • Talking with workers about their safety and health concerns

  • Helping the employer (called management) develop and monitor policies, plans and programs

  • Participating in incident investigations and investigations of dangerous occurrences (called "near misses")

  • Meeting to discuss concerns and make recommendations for corrective action to discuss with the employer


Workers have a right to a safe and healthy workplace. Since workers may be more aware of the daily hazards they face than the employer, it makes sense for them to have an essential role in hazard identification, assessment and control.


Every officer, director, manager, contractor, supplier, contracted employer or self-employed person, supervisor and worker must do everything that can reasonably be expected to maintain safe and healthy working conditions (in other words, "show due diligence").


Joint worker/management workplace safety and health committees (committees) play an invaluable role in helping the internal responsibility system for safety and health succeed.

 

EMPLOYER (MANAGEMENT) RESPONSIBILITIES


Management Structure and RETSD Practices

 

Management Structure and RETSD Practices: This represents the commitment and role of the employer, directors, owners and senior officers in:

 

Establishing and communicating a commitment from the employer that safety and health is a top priority.

 

Practices in Place:

 

  • Distribution or Worker Safety handbook

  • Posting of Worker Safety Handbook in Workplace

  • Workplace Safety and Health Department Intranet Page

 

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

 

  • Workplace Safety and Health Department Intranet Page

  • Workplace Safety and Health Department Website Page

  • Superintendent's Safety Message Video

Setting goals for the safety and health program/policy by:

 

  • setting objectives to help the organization evaluate its program

  • establishing clear standards of performance

  • holding subordinates accountable for their performance

  • setting rewards for effective performance

Practices in Place:

  • Annual Incident Report Analysis

  • Safety Audits

  • Worksite Safety Action Plans

 

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintaining and continual improvement of practices in place

Establishing an effective system to implement the desired performance by:

 

  • setting up an effective chain of command

  • providing adequate operating authority and responsibility

  • providing adequate delegation of responsibility

  • hiring and training competent staff

 Practices in Place:

  • Existing division hiring processes

  • Existing organization structure

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

Establish a policy/system to ensure the workplace is designed and maintained properly by:

 

  • properly engineering operations, workplace layout and production (through suitable ergonomics, lighting, ventilation, temperature control, etc.)

  • ensuring safety and health is a major consideration in equipment purchasing and general procurement

  • implementing effective orientation and training programs

  • involving workers in developing the safety and health program through the workplace safety and health committee or worker safety and health representative (representative)

  • establishing an effective workplace safety and health committee or designating a capable representative

  • knowing and complying with the legislation

 

Practices in Place:

 

  • Engineering and Design Program through Maintenance Department

 

  • New Worker Orientation Programs

 

  • Divisional Committee reviews all safety manual documentation, makes recommendations etc. as part of standard operating procedure for the committee (see Agenda and Minutes)

 

  • Divisional Committee, Site Committees and Site Safety Teams

 

  • Written safety program manual based on legislation

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

 

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

 

Key Concept:

Accountability is proportional to responsibility. The employer is ultimately responsible and accountable for safety and health.

 

Managent Responsibilities and RETSD Practices 

Management Responsibilities and RETSD Practices: Manager responsibility refers to the role of middle management in allocating adequate resources for safety and health. It also describes their responsibilities for ensuring that supervisors under their authority carry out their duties properly. Managers can help the employer to establish a safety and health culture by:

 

  • following the policies of the employer and ensuring supervisors follow them also

Practices in Place:

  • Standard performance management

 

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

  • establishing goals that will help implement the employer's policies and programs in the local work area

Practices in Place:

  • Divisional Strategic Plan

  • Safety and Health Department Safety Program Implementation Plan

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

  • developing and enforcing safe and healthy work procedures

Practices in Place:

  • Standard supervisory practices

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

  • allocating adequate resources for safety and health

Practices in Place:

  • Annual budget allotment established for Safety and Health

  • Project based non-budget allocations as per projects scope

  • Safety and Health Officer full time resource for facilitate program implementation

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place. 

  • ensuring supervisors are properly selected and trained in their responsibilities

Practices in Place:

  • Existing division hiring processes

  • Existing organization structure

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Safety Training for Management Workers Program

  • providing supervisors with the necessary authority and responsibility for safety and health

Practices in Place:

  • Standard supervisory practices

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

  • holding supervisors accountable for their performance

 

Practices in Place:

  • Standard performance management

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

  • ensuring there are enough supervisors to effectively supervise workers and control hazards

 

Practices in Place:

  • Standard staffing processes

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

  • assisting the local committee to carry out its duties effectively

Practices in Place:

  • Administrators as management representatives on site safety teams.

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place. 

  • knowing and complying with the legislation

Practices in Place:

  • Safety and Health Officer as coach and resource to all workers regarding safety legislation.

  • Legislation displayed and accessible in all worksites (Workplace Safety Program Binder)

  • Electronic links and postings on intranet

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Safety Training for Management Workers Program

  • Electronic postings on safety website

  • scheduling (such as shifts and work processes) with safety and health in mind

Practices in Place:

  • Maintenance scheduling processes

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

 

Key Concept:

As representatives of the employer, the law holds managers and supervisors accountable for their safety and health actions. Sometimes, someone with a higher responsibility fails to carry out a duty. Under the legislation, this does not relieve others of their duties.

 

Supervisor / Person in Charge Responsibilities and RETSD Practices 

Supervisor / Person in Charge Responsibilities and RETSD Practices: In the legislation, a supervisor is identified as a person who has charge of a workplace or authority over a worker. While supervisors have all of the rights and duties of workers, they also share some of the employer's responsibilities. Supervisors are critical to effective safety and health practices. Supervisors can help the employer keep the workplace safe and healthy by:

 

  • taking training in their safety and health duties and responsibilities

Practices in Place:

  • On the job training

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Safety Training for Management Workers Program

  • establishing goals that help implement the employer's program in the local work area

Practices in Place:

  • Site Safety Action Plans and Operations

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

  • setting an example by working and acting safely

Practices in Place:

  • Standard performance management

  • Site safety Team participation

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

  • following the policy of the employer and ensuring workers follow it also

Practices in Place:

  • Standard performance management

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

  • allocating adequate resources for safety and health

Practices in Place:

  • Annual budget allotment established for Safety and Health

  • Project based non-budget allocations as per projects scope

  • Safety and Health Officer full time resource for facilitate program implementation

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

  • conducting regular inspections, group meetings and other safety and health activities

Practices in Place:

  • Committee Operations (All)

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

  • ensuring workers are properly orientated and trained

Practices in Place:

  • On the job training

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • New Worker Safety Orientation and Review Program

  • coaching workers in safety and health

Practices in Place:

  • Standard performance management

  • Safety Officer resource

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

  • establishing and enforcing safe work procedures, rules and practices

Practices in Place:

  • Standard performance management

  • Safe work procedures program

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

  • providing workers with the necessary authority and responsibility for safety and health

Practices in Place:

  • Standard performance management

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place. 

  • holding workers accountable for their performance

Practices in Place:

  • Standard performance management

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

  • identifying the underlying cause of incidents and other departures from safety and health practices, and taking corrective action

Practices in Place:

  • Standard performance management

  • Safety Officer resource

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

  • responding to workers' safety and health concerns promptly and creating an environment where workers are encouraged to bring these concerns forward

Practices in Place:

  • Standard performance management

  • Safety Officer resource

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

  • cooperating with the workplace safety and health committee

Practices in Place:

  • Standard performance management

  • Safety Officer resource

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

  • knowing and complying with legislation

Practices in Place:

  • Standard performance management

  • Safety Officer resource

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

 

INTERNAL RESPONSIBILITY SYSTEM


The philosophy of internal responsibility recognizes that employers have a legal and moral duty to provide a safe and healthy workplace. Worker participation is crucial to effective safety and health, because only worker participation allows hazards to be properly identified and controlled. The philosophy of internal responsibility is based on:

  • Personal responsibility

  • Inclusiveness

  • Cooperation

  • Sharing of information

  • Accountability

 

Personal Responsibility

Each individual is responsible for integrating safety and health into work life. Safety and health is everyone's responsibility.

 

Key Concept: The committee is not the enforcer of the IRS—it is the system's auditor.

 

Inclusiveness

Everyone is involved in the IRS, both as individuals and as members of a group (workers, managers and committee members). Shared responsibilities complement each other.

 

Cooperation

Everyone's objective should be the same—to improve safety and health. Workers and employers are expected to work together to identify and resolve safety and health problems. The committee functions as a safety and health team. Differences of opinion and position are expected. However, if the approach taken is unduly confrontational or uncooperative, then the committee may not be effective.

 

Matters of employee or labour relations should be addressed using other mechanisms outside of the joint safety and health committee.

 

Sharing of Information

Everyone has a right to receive information needed to identify and control hazards in the workplace. Information is needed before each person can adequately assume responsibility for safety and health. Good information is particularly important for workplace safety and health committee members.

 

Accountability

 Our responsibility for maintaining a safe and healthy workplace comes with our right to a safe and healthy workplace. Everyone is accountable (as an individual) for carrying out their responsibilities. The greater the authority, the greater the accountability. An effective IRS requires competent management and supervision, employees who work and act safely and a committee that is effective.

 

IRS1.jpg

IRS2.jpg

 

Direct Legislated Responsibilities

 

In Manitoba, The Workplace Safety and Health Act and regulations assign duties for the control of workplace hazards to those people who are directly responsible for:

  • the organization of work

  • the design of the work process

  • the manner and conditions under which work is performed

 

In simple terms, employers, supervisors and workers all have responsibilities for:

 

  • identification of hazards

  • analysis of the risks posed by those hazards

  • communication of information throughout the workplace about the risks

  • control of those risks

 

The employer's responsibilities are the broadest and cover all areas of safety and health in the organization.

 

Usually, managers are responsible for the safety and health of all employees who report to them. Supervisors are responsible for the safety and health of their workers in all areas where they work.

 

Workers are responsible for protecting their safety and health and helping supervisors ensure the safety of their work areas, tools, equipment and machinery.

 

Others with direct responsibilities include:

  • self-employed persons (including consultants)

  • contractors (someone who directs the activities of one or more self-employed person or employer)

  • owners

  • suppliers

 IRS3.jpg

Due Diligence and RETSD Practices

 

 Due Diligence and RETSD Practices: Due diligence describes a very high standard to take reasonable care. In the context of the Act and regulations, this due diligence standard is reflected in the following principles:

 

General duties – The Act imposes a duty on everyone in the workplace to take reasonable care to protect their safety and health and that of others, to the degree that they have the authority and ability to do so. This general duty is in addition to, and goes beyond, merely complying with the law.

Practices in Place:

  • Full written safety program / manual with responsibilities of workers identified in each

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

Regulatory compliance – If someone is charged with contravening the legislation, they cannot successfully defend themselves by saying that they did not intend to break the law or did not mean to fail to comply. To defend themselves adequately, they must be able to show that they took every reasonably practicable action to ensure compliance.

Practices in Place:

  • Full written safety program / manual with responsibilities of workers identified in each

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

Reasonably practicable – What a reasonable person, in the same position and circumstance would have done to prevent the incident. When making that determination, three main factors need to be taken into account: (1) foreseeability; (2) preventability; (3) control.

Practices in Place:

  • All safe operating procedures and safe work procedures

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

Proactive – Due diligence requires a proactive and systematic approach to safety and health. This standard can best be met within a workplace by establishing and implementing a safety and health program that:

  • identifies hazards

  • assesses the risks associated with those hazards

  • implements measures to eliminate or minimize those risks

  • monitors each part of the program to ensure that it is adequate and effective

Practices in Place:

  • All safe operating procedures and safe work procedures programs

  • Safety Manual management and update

  • Rigorous formal and informal inspection schedule

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

Employers must develop and implement this plan in consultation with their workers. Workers must comply with the program to the extent that they have the knowledge, authority, and ability to do so.

Practices in Place:

  • All safe operating procedures and safe work procedures programs

  • Safety Manual management and update

  • Rigorous formal and informal inspection schedule

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

 

Worker Rights

Recognizing that power is not shared equally among employers, supervisors and workers, the Act sets out three basic rights of workers within the IRS:

  • The right to know and understand about the hazards in the workplace, how to identify them and how to protect themselves.

  • The right to participate in making workplace safety and health decisions through consultation with committees, worker representatives and other workers.

  • The right to refuse work believed by the refusing worker to be dangerous.

The Act also prohibits employers from acting against a worker for fulfilling responsibilities or exercising rights under the legislation. This protection is fundamental to making the IRS work. Protection motivates and empowers workers to fulfil their legislative duties and participate in a meaningful way in the control of workplace hazards.

 

In this way it encourages workers to help the employer provide a safe and healthy workplace.

 

In short, the IRS sets up a system of checks and balances within the workplace that enables workers, supervisors and employers to integrate the best possible safety and health practices into daily activities.

 

Committee Responsibilities and RETSD Practices 

 Committee Responsibilities and RETSD Practices: Major responsibilities include:

 

  • participating in the identification and control of hazards

  • helping to identify and resolve safety and health concerns of workers

  • receiving and distributing information, including publications sent from the Workplace Safety and Health Division to employers and employees

  • inspecting the workplace regularly

  • meeting regularly to discuss workplace safety and health concerns

  • maintaining records of meetings and returning copies to the Workplace Safety and Health Division

  • investigating reportable incidents (i.e. serious incidents reportable to the Workplace Safety and Health Division.)

  • helping to establish and promote safety and health programs and policies

  • helping to develop and promote safety and health training

  • investigating refusals to work under section 43 of the Act

  • carrying out responsibilities set by specific regulations

 

Practices in Place:

 

  • Site Safety Team Operations

  • Safety Manual reviews

  • Participation in formal and informal facility inspections

  • Investigate all reported incidents with at least a conversation with the report filer

  • Investigate all serious workplace reportable incidents with applicable committee members.

Developing Practices and Continual Improvement:

 

  • Focus on maintenance and continual improvement of practices in place.

  • Worker safety training program

 

Linking Workplace Safety and Health Division and Workplace Committees

 

1.      Routine inspections – When an inspector visits the workplace, the worker co-chairperson of the committee or his/her designate, (or a worker safety and health representative) should accompany the inspector. The committee member or worker representative can ask the officer for advice about concerns at the workplace. In turn, the officer provides the committee with a report on the results of the inspection. Stop work or improvement orders may be issued resulting from routine inspections by a provincial inspector.

 

2.      Complaints – Anyone can contact the WS&H Division for assistance and advice if the IRS has not dealt with a concern effectively. The legislation protects those who call.

 

3.      Work refusals – Often, a work refusal is a sign of a failure in the IRS. Refusals are often resolved by the worker and supervisor involved. Some are resolved by the worker co-chair of the safety and health committee. During a refusal to work, contact the Workplace Safety and Health Division if the matter has not been resolved. In such cases, a workplace safety and health officer will investigate and make a ruling. The worker may continue the refusal until the officer rules. The officer will provide a written decision to the refusing worker, each co-chairperson and the employer.

 

4.      Investigations – Employers must notify the WS&H Division about incidents/serious incidents set out in the regulations. If an inspector investigates, the committee or worker representative has an opportunity to inform the officer about concerns.

 

5.      Failure of the committee – If the committee cannot function effectively, an inspector should be asked for help. Committee minutes sent to the WS&H Division often provide the first clue that things are not going well. A dysfunctional committee is a sign of deeper problems with the IRS. An inspector may intervene.

 

6.      Disputes – An inspector may intervene to resolve conflict in the committee. If necessary, an officer can issue an Improvement Order requiring the employer (or anyone else covered by the legislation) to take corrective action.

 

RETSD SAFETY COMMITTEE STRUCTURE

 

Divisional Workplace Safety and Health Committee

 

Operational variance continuance granted from June 2014 for a 3-year period to June 2017 by Workplace Safety and Health Division.

 

  • All worker members are elected by their respective worker groups

  • Management members are appointed by RETSD

  • Names of Divisional Committee members and minutes of committee meetings are posted on Workplace Safety and Health bulletin boards in each facility

  • The primary role of this committee is to consult with management on the overall development and implementation of a safety program across the division

 

Terms of Reference

 

 

Operational Standards

 

RETSD operates a divisional health and safety committee in compliance with all provincial legislation, regulations and codes of practice for the operation of health and safety committees in Manitoba.

 

The workplace safety and health committee will be the formal communications group regarding safety- and health-related issues and concerns in the workplace.

 

The committee, with the support of management, shall take an active role in the development and implementation of an effective health and safety program at RETSD.

 

All committee members, as part of their duties, shall review and become familiar with the Manitoba government publication titled, Workplace Safety and Health Program Committee Manual.

 

For the purposes of RETSD, the "division" is deemed to be one "place of employment" with one committee serving the whole division and each facility site having one safety and health worker representative.

 

Membership

 

RETSD workplace safety and health committee(s) are to be comprised of the following, unless changes are made by mutual agreement of all committee members.

 

Management Representation

 

  • One superintendent or equivalent (management co-chairperson)

  • One director of maintenance or designate

  • One director of transportation or designate

  • One safety and health officer

 

Total number of employer representatives: four

Quorum requirements: two representatives from this group must be present at meetings

 

Worker Representation

 

  • Two River East Transcona Teachers' Association members (RETTA)

  • Two River East Transcona Educational Assistant Association  members (RETEA)

  • One Canadian Union of Public Employees, clerical member (CUPE)

  • Two Canadian Union of Public Employees, custodial/maintenance/kitchen staff members (CUPE)

  • One Canadian Union of Public Employees, library member (CUPE)

  • One Canadian Union of Public Employees, transportation member (CUPE)

  • One representative from non-union employees

 

Total number of worker representatives: 10

Quorum requirements: five representatives from this group must be present at meetings

 

Total divisional committee membership: 14

 

Member Elections or Appointments

 

Appointments to the committee are made annually in the fall. Care should be taken to ensure each employee group is represented.

 

Term of office of committee members shall be one year. Members are eligible for re-appointment; however, it is recommended that appointments do not exceed three years in succession.

 

The names of the committee members shall be posted on all division workplace safety and health bulletin boards. The current posting mechanism is that all current committee member names are listed on the official committee minutes.

 

There shall be two co-chairpersons chosen for the committee (one from management representation, one from worker representation), to be selected annually. Co-chairpersons shall be identified as such on the committee name list.

 

The chairperson of the committee shall alternate from meeting to meeting between the co-chairpersons.

 

Alternate Committee Members are duly appointed or elected RETSD employees who are meant to serve as substitutes, in place of, elected or appointed committee members who cannot attend a meeting.

 

The purpose of having alternate members is to help ensure quorum for meetings and to ensure that the specific group's interests and views are properly represented at the committee.

 

Employee groups / associations / unions are not required to select alternates.  If an employee group / association / union does select alternates, they shall appoint or elect alternate committee members in the same manner that they appoint or elect safety committee members.

 

Alternates have full standing to participate in the committee proceedings as committee members do, meaning that they can participate and vote.

 

To act as an alternate, at a minimum the worker must:

 

  • understand the basic functions and purpose of the committee
  • be made aware of the meeting agenda for the meeting they will be attending
  • have sufficient knowledge and adequate background knowledge of the issues to be discussed at the meeting through consultation with their respective committee member(s) and / or review of previous meeting minutes.

 

It is the responsibility of the employee group / association / unions to properly prepare and support alternates for their role.

 

Meetings

 

A minimum of four meetings shall be held during the school year (10-month period, September to June); not less than once in each calendar quarter.

 

Meetings are to be called by the co-chairperson. The meeting schedule for the year should be planned as part of the new business portion of the first meeting of the year. The meeting schedule, when determined and agreed upon, shall be posted, currently on the front page of committee meeting minutes.

 

All committee members shall be individually notified in advance of all meetings.

 

The division shall provide a meeting place.

 

The quorum for meetings shall consist of one-half of the worker committee members and one-half of the management committee members, with at least one co-chairperson present.

 

The co-chairpersons shall ensure the preparation of committee agendas.

 

Meeting Agendas

 

The co-chairpersons shall ensure the preparation of committee agendas. Generally, the committee agendas shall include the review of:

 

  • Minutes of last meeting and motions to be accepted as printed or modified as required

 

  • Carry-over items and records of updated status of action items

 

  • New items, committee objectives and status of subcommittee projects

 

  • Statistics, including first-aid injuries, medical-aid injuries, lost-time injuries, dangerous-incident reports, formal-facility inspection checklists

 

  • Dangerous-occurrence, incident and accident reports

 

  • Safe operating procedure reviews when revisions are made or as part of a regular review schedule.

 

Minutes

 

The co-chairpersons shall ensure minutes of the meeting are recorded.

 

The minutes shall be posted on all RETSD workplace safety and health bulletin boards before the next regular meeting. The original shall be retained in the records of the committee with copies distributed to committee members.

 

Generally, all action items listed in the minutes, wherever reasonable and practicable, shall be resolved with 30 days.

 

Divisional minutes shall be submitted to the Manitoba Workplace Safety and Health Division on a regular basis (e-mail: cominutes@gov.mb.ca).

 

Generally, minutes should be submitted to the workplace safety and health division with 7 days of the committee meeting.

 

Committee Hierarchy

Committee Hierarchy.jpg

All committee member listings, meeting schedules and minutes are posted on the workplace safety and health bulletin boards at each facility.

 

Safety concern resolution process for all workers:

  1. Report all safety concerns to your supervisor or person in charge first to give them a chance to respond and correct the concern.

  2. Consult with your workplace safety committee members and/or site teams as required or as desired to discuss safety concerns and potential solutions.

  3. Remember, you have the right and responsibility to participate and workplace safety and health in your workplace.

 

Site Teams and Site Committees, where applicable, are responsible for the following:

  1. Receiving safety incident reports at the local level, and forwarding completed reports to the Safety and Health Office.

  2. Coordinating safety concern or incident responses, investigations, and developing corrective action plans as required. (Safety Officer Cell: 204.471.5693 or email safetyofficer@retsd.mb.ca)

  3. Liaise with Safety and Health Office on serious incidents, dangerous occurrences, and any contact with the provincial Workplace Safety and Health Division.

  4. Managing corrective action plan activities and monitoring effectiveness.

  5. Conducting semiannual inspections and ensuring other inspection programs are being completed as designed.

 

Site Safety Committee Locations

 

The following RETSD school facilities have site workplace safety and health committees, due to facility size and vocational lab needs:

 

  • Kildonan-East Collegiate

  • Murdoch MacKay Collegiate

 

Minutes

 

The minutes from site committee meetings shall be submitted to the divisional workplace safety and health committee, and then submitted by the divisional committee to the Workplace Safety and Health Division. (e-mail: cominutes@gov.mb.ca).

 

SITE SAFETY TEAMS

 

Member Elections or Appointments

 

School or building (site) safety and health worker representatives are considered associates of the workplace safety and health committee. Their role is to support the activities of the divisional workplace safety and health committee and to be part of the site safety teams.

 

School or building safety and health worker representatives shall be elected from the staff of the building on an annual basis.

 

The worker representative shall not be the school or building administrator or building custodian.

 

Members are eligible for re-election; however, it is recommended that appointments do not exceed three years in succession.

 

Specific Duties of Site Safety Representatives

 

It is the specific responsibility of the site safety representative to:

 

  • Post all information received regarding workplace safety and health, including the names of the committee members, minutes of meetings, site inspection reports and responses from the committee on the workplace safety and health bulletin board in their building.

 

  • Inform their staff and co-workers of important workplace safety and health information at staff meetings. (Standing staff meeting agenda item required for workplace safety and health)

 

  • Keep records of all workplace safety and health concerns reported, inspection records and corrective action records.

 

The committee shall annually develop, review and implement a plan and checklists for on-site inspections. These inspections are separate from, and in addition to, all other inspections.

 

Safety Action Plan Management

 

Each team is expected to keep a running record of workplace safety activities for their worksite by using the safety action plan database.

 

EDUCATIONAL LEAVE FOR SAFETY COMMITTEE MEMBERS

 

Worker representatives of the workplace safety and health committee and each workplace safety and health site representative shall be allowed educational leave to a maximum of two regular working days for the purpose of attending workplace safety and health training seminars sponsored or approved by the workplace safety and health division or as approved by the committee.

 

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS FOR SAFETY AND HEALTH COMMITTEES AND TEAMS

 

  • All activities and functions of the committee and school and/or building (site) safety and health worker representatives shall be scheduled during working hours with no loss of wages.

 

  • The committee shall ensure the division has a comprehensive asbestos-management program in place. Employees have the right to know that asbestos may or may not exist in the school/building in which they work.

 

  • Each school/building has a binder in the staff room that maps out where asbestos may be found. Signage is erected in each school/building that also informs the staff/students/visitors of the location of this hazardous material.

 

  • The committee shall ensure the division meets the requirements of regulations under the act pertaining to hearing-conservation programs.

 

  • The committee shall ensure all incidents and dangerous occurrences are properly investigated by the investigation team, any injuries or accidents are reported immediately and the injury-management program and its procedures are followed.

 

  • The committee shall ensure that the division provides information to all employees with regards to the right to refuse to work when they have reasonable grounds to believe the particular work is dangerous to the safety and health of themselves or others.

 

  • All staff must be aware of the importance of the working alone procedure (Working Alone or in Isolation; department manuals for maintenance and transportation staff for their specific employee group) and to ensure that the procedure be followed.

 

  • The division will plan, develop and implement a workplace safety and health program in consultation with the committee and will address the specific needs of the workplace.

 

RISK ASSESSMENT BASICS

 

What is a hazard?

 

A hazard is any activity, situation or substance that can cause harm. Occupational hazards are divided into two broad categories: (1) health hazards, and (2) safety hazards. Generally, health hazards cause occupational illnesses, such as noise induced hearing loss. Safety hazards cause physical harm, such as cuts, broken bones, etc. Hazards exist in all workplaces.

 

What is an occupational illness?

 

Occupational illnesses are usually caused by health hazards. An occupational illness is a condition that results from exposure to a chemical or biological substance, a physical agent (an energy source such as noise) or other stressors capable of causing harm. The time that it takes an illness to develop after exposure to a health hazard is called the "latency period".

 

What is probability?

 

Probability is the chance that a hazard will cause harm. In risk management systems, probability is often categorized as:

 

  • frequent (workers are frequently at risk)

  • probable (the hazard is likely to cause harm)

  • occasional (workers are occasionally at risk)

  • remote (the hazard could cause harm, but is very unlikely to do so)

  • improbable (the hazard is unlikely to ever cause harm)

 

What is severity?

 

Severity is the seriousness of the harm that could result from contact with a hazard. It is described as:

 

  • catastrophic (death and/or severe destruction)

  • critical (serious injury and/or property damage)

  • marginal (minor injury and/or property damage)

  • negligible (no injury and/or property damage)

 

What is a risk?

 

Risk describes the odds that a hazard will cause harm. It refers to the probability and severity of potential incidents. Risk management is a technique used to identify and control risk caused by hazards.

 

What is risk analysis?

 

The combination of identifying hazards and assessing their risk is called risk analysis. Risk analysis

can help committee members and the employer to set priorities. Risk is calculated by using the formula:

 

Risk = Probability x Severity

 

Normally, hazards with the highest risk that affect the most workers should receive the greatest attention.

 

To prioritize a response and corrective action:

 Risk Matrix.jpg


CONTROLLING HAZARDS

 

Control at the source

 

Elimination – First, try eliminating the hazard. Getting rid of a hazardous job, tool, process, machine or substance may be the best way of protecting workers.

 

Substitution – If elimination is not practical, try replacing hazardous job, tool, process, machine or substance with something less hazardous. For example, a hazardous chemical can be replaced with a less hazardous one. A safer work practice can be used. Be sure to also identify, assess and control the hazards of substitutes.

 

Redesign – Sometimes engineering can be used to redesign the layout of the workplace, workstations, work processes and jobs to prevent ergonomic hazards. For example, containers can be redesigned to be easier to hold and lift. Engineering may be able to improve workplace lighting, ventilation, temperature, process controls and so forth.

 

Isolation – Isolating, containing or enclosing the hazard is often used to control chemical hazards and biohazards. For example, fume hoods are used in chemistry labs to isolate chemicals being used from the rest of the lab.

 

Automation – Dangerous processes can sometimes be automated or mechanized. For example, spot welding operations in car plants can be handled by computer-controlled robots. Care must be taken to protect workers from robotic hazards.

Control along the path from the hazard to the worker

 

Hazards that cannot be isolated, replaced, enclosed or automated can sometimes be removed, blocked, absorbed or diluted before they reach workers. Usually, the further a control keeps hazards away from workers, the more effective it is.

 

  • Barriers – A hazard can be blocked. For example, proper equipment guarding can protect workers from contacting moving parts. Screens and barriers can block welding flash from reaching workers. Machinery lockout systems can protect maintenance workers from physical agents such as electricity, heat, pressure and radiation.

 

  • Absorption – Baffles can block or absorb noise. Local exhaust ventilation can remove toxic gasses, dusts and fumes where they are produced.

 

  • Dilution – Some hazards can be diluted or dissipated. For example, general (dilution) ventilation might dilute the concentration of a hazardous gas with clean, tempered air from the outside.

 

Control at the level of the worker

 

Control at the level of the worker usually does not remove the risk posed by a hazard. It only reduces the risk of the hazard injuring the worker and lessens the potential seriousness of an injury.

 

Therefore, most safety and health experts consider control at the level of the worker to be the least effective means of protecting workers.

 

Administrative controls – These include introducing new policies, improving work procedures and requiring workers to use specific personal protective equipment and hygiene practices. For example, job rotations and scheduling can reduce the time that workers are exposed to a hazard. Workers can be rotated through jobs requiring repetitive tendon and muscle movements to prevent cumulative trauma injuries. Noisy processes can be scheduled when few workers are in the workplace. Standardized written work procedures can ensure that work is done safely. Employees can be required to use shower and change facilities to prevent absorption of chemical contaminants. The employer is responsible for enforcing administrative controls.

 

Work procedures, training and supervision – Supervisors can be trained to apply modern safety management and supervisory practices. Workers can be trained to use standardized safe work practices.

 

The committee or representative should help the employer periodically review and update operating procedures and worker training. Refresher training should be offered periodically (typically 36 months or less). The employer is expected to ensure that employees follow safe work practices.

 

Emergency planning – Written plans should be in place to handle fires, chemical spills and other emergencies. Workers should be trained to follow these procedures and use appropriate equipment. Refresher training should be provided regularly.

 

Housekeeping, repair and maintenance programs – Housekeeping includes cleaning, waste disposal and spill cleanup. Tools, equipment and machinery are less likely to cause injury if they are kept clean and well maintained.

 

Hygiene practices and facilities – Hygiene practices can reduce the risk of toxic materials being absorbed by workers or carried home to their families. Street clothing should be kept in separate lockers to avoid contamination from work clothing. Eating areas can be segregated from work areas. Eating, drinking and smoking should be forbidden in toxic work areas. Where applicable, workers may be required to shower and change clothes at the end of the shift.

 

Personal protective equipment (PPE) and clothing – PPE and clothing are used when:

 

  • other controls aren't feasible, (for example, to protect workers from noise exposure when in gymnasiums)

  • where additional protection is needed

  • where the task or process is temporary (such as periodic maintenance work)

 

Personal protective equipment is much less effective than engineering controls since it does not eliminate the hazard. It must be used properly and consistently to be effective. Awkward or bulky PPE may prevent a worker from working safely. In some cases, PPE can even create hazards, such as heat stress. The employer must require workers to use PPE wherever its use is prescribed by the regulations or organizational work procedures. Workers must be trained to use, store and maintain their equipment properly. The employer, supervisor and workers must understand the limitations of their personal protective equipment.

 

Selecting controls


Selecting a control often involves:

  • evaluating and selecting temporary and permanent controls

  • implementing temporary measures until permanent (engineering) controls can be put in place

  • implementing permanent controls when reasonably practicable

 

For example, suppose a noise hazard is identified. Temporary measures might require workers to use hearing protection. Long term, permanent controls might use engineering to remove or isolate the noise source.

Monitoring the effectiveness of controls

 

Sometimes hazard controls do not work as well as expected. Therefore, the committee or representative should monitor the effectiveness of the corrective action taken by the employer during inspections and other activities.

 

Ask these questions:

 

  • Have the controls solved the problem?

  • Is the risk posed by the original hazard contained?

  • Have any new hazards been created?

  • Are new hazards appropriately controlled?

  • Are monitoring processes adequate?

  • Have workers been adequately informed about the situation?

  • Have orientation and training programs been modified to deal with the new situation?

  • Are any other measures required?

 

Document the effectiveness of hazard controls in your committee minutes or facility action plans

 

What else can be done?

 

Once hazards have been identified, assessed and controlled, the employer and the safety and health committee or worker representative should work together to develop:

 

  • training programs for workers

  • emergency response procedures

  • safety and health requirements for contracted employers and self-employed persons

 

The committee or worker representative should monitor these activities to ensure they are effective.

 

INVESTIGATING SAFETY REPORTS

 

An accident is any unplanned event that causes injury. A dangerous occurrence is any event that could have caused injury, but did not. Dangerous occurrences are often called "near misses". The term "incident" will be used to describe both accidents and dangerous occurrences.

 

All incidents should be investigated, whether they have to be reported to the Workplace Safety and Health Division or not. At a minimum, a worker must verbally report incidents at RETSD to a supervisor or person in charge. This discussion will constitute a minimum investigation into all reported incidents

 

Investigations should identify safety and health problems and help prevent future incidents. They should not be blame fixing exercises. Each incident usually has several contributing factors, not all of which are obvious.

 

Investigators must look for the deeper causes and not simply record events.

 

The employer must ensure that the committee is involved in investigations of serious, reportable incidents. These include incidents that cause the death of a worker or require a worker to be hospitalized. The employer, prime contractor or owner may investigate incidents, depending on who has control over the situation.

 

If the incident involves a fatality, once the injured are cared for and the site is made safe, the scene must not be disturbed until an investigation can be made.

 

Reportable incidents

 

The employer must report to the Workplace Safety and Health Division any of the following:

 

  1. Death, or serious injury (serious injuries include: fracture of a major bone; amputation; loss of sight, internal hemorrhage; third degree burns; unconsciousness resulting from concussion, electrical contact, asphyxiation; poisoning; cuts requiring hospitalization or time off work; any injury resulting in paralysis; any other injury likely to endanger life or cause permanent disability).

  2. Collapse or structural failure of a building, tower, crane, hoist, temporary construction support system or excavation.

  3. An uncontrolled spill or escape of a toxic, corrosive or explosive substance.

  4. Explosion, fire or flooding.

 

Planning Investigations

 

The better the planning, the better the investigation. The better the investigation, the more easily a similar incident can be avoided. The employer should work with the committee to prepare an investigation plan setting out the following.

 

Investigations – What incidents will be investigated? The employer and committee are encouraged to investigate all incidents that could have hurt someone.

 

All reported incidents at a minimum require a verbal discussion between management and the worker.

 

All workplace safety and health division reportable incidents require a full investigation with appropriate documentation and corrective actions.

Procedures – How will incidents be investigated? Employers, committees, workers and supervisors should know exactly what to do if an incident happens.

See investigation procedure contained in this document.

Training – The employer must ensure that committee members are trained in their responsibilities. Each member should attend workshops on how to investigate incidents. Employers are also encouraged to attend.

See investigation training module.

Resources – The employer should ensure that the necessary tools, personal protective equipment, etc., are available.

 

Standard operating procedure.

 

Investigation General Methodology

 

Generally, investigations should:

 

(1) compare what should have happened with what actually happened

(2) determine what gap exists between the two

(3) determine why the gap developed

(4) recommend appropriate corrective action to prevent a recurrence

 

Government regulations, company standards and industry publications should be used to decide what standards should have been in place. This data can also help to decide what corrective action is required.

Carrying out investigations

 

Incidents where death or injury has occurred or that have the potential for injury or loss must be investigated by the committee. The employer must prepare a report in consultation with the committee. A copy must be sent to the Workplace Safety and Health Division at the request of a safety and health officer.

 

The employer must notify the Workplace Safety and Health Division about fatalities and serious incidents. Where there is a fatality or foul play is suspected, call the RCMP or local

police.

 

The site of a serious incident or fatality must not be disturbed, except to relieve suffering of an injured person, or to avoid creating additional hazards, until a provincial safety and health officer has investigated.

 

The committee's investigation should find the root causes of the incident so that it will not happen again.

 

Generally, investigations normally include these steps:

 

  1. secure the scene and report the incident

  2. study the scene

  3. interview witnesses

  4. investigate the physical evidence

 

Secure the scene and report the incident

 

Things that the supervisor or manager must do include:

 

  • assessing and stabilizing the situation

  • making the area safe for emergency crews and investigators

  • dealing with the injured

  • securing the scene and protecting evidence until an investigation starts

  • getting the names of witnesses

  • keeping witnesses from talking with each other until they can be interviewed (to keep viewpoints distinct)

  • reporting any serious incidents to the Workplace Safety and Health Division

 

Notifications to the Workplace Safety and Health Division must contain:

 

  • the date, time and location of the incident

  • a description of what happened

  • the name of each employer or prime contractor at the place of employment, including the employer of any

  • injured worker(s)

  • the name, telephone and fax number of the person to be contacted for more information

  • If the incident involves a serious injury, the notification should also include the name of each injured worker and

  • the apparent injuries to each.

 

Study the scene

 

  • Look at everything involved in the incident. Carefully go over the debris and note the damage.

  • Record the exact location of the incident. Note the lighting, visibility, time of day and weather conditions.

  • Look at the pattern of the debris and the location of each piece.

  • Take photographs, measurements and drawings of the scene and everything involved. Be sure to make notes for each illustration.

  • Label and catalogue each diagram, drawing and photo.

  • Find out who was involved and who can provide expert advice on technical issues. Prepare a list of witnesses and experts to interview.

  • Prepare a list of questions to ask.

 

Interview witnesses

 

Accurate interview records will be needed to reconstruct what happened and why. Therefore, the employer and committee should reach an agreement about how witnesses will be interviewed. For example, if the RCMP, police or safety and health officers have already interviewed witnesses, further statement taking may not be needed.

 

Everyone who can provide information should be contacted. Interview eyewitnesses in private when possible, while memories are still fresh. Consider their emotional state, particularly if someone has been killed or seriously injured. Use open-ended questions and let the witnesses explain events in their own words. Avoid interrupting during their statements. Ask clarifying questions later if necessary. Use photographs and drawings to help witnesses remember.

 

If possible, have each witness visit the scene and show you what he or she saw. Witnesses will have seen events from different perspectives and their statements will often disagree. After eyewitnesses have been interviewed, talk to technical specialists, suppliers and experts. At the end of every interview:

 

  • ask each witness to review their statement

  • clear up anything you do not understand

  • get the phone number and address of each witness if necessary

  • thank each witness

 

Investigate the physical evidence

 

Study the damage done to tools, equipment, products, etc. Try to find out what the physical evidence indicates happened and why.

 

Look at the details of the work environment. Consider visibility, noise, temperature, humidity and exposure to hazardous substances. Make detailed photographs and drawings. Describe everything involved in detail, including work procedures and safety policies.

 

Collect product documentation, including the exact names of any substances involved. Gather material safety data sheets (MSDSs), blueprints and workflow diagrams that might help. Find out if any changes in design, products or work procedures were introduced before the incident.

 

Compare what happened with the requirements of applicable standards. If requirements were not met, find out why.

 

Finding the causes

 

The causes of an incident can often be found by asking Who + What + Where + When + How for every essential event in the incident until you know why the incident happened.

 

Separate facts from theory and opinion as much as possible. Look for underlying causes and avoid jumping to conclusions. Analyze the factors surrounding the incident.

 

Analyze the incident factors

 

Go through the incident in stages. Ask "why" each event happened. Evaluate the role of every factor

involved, including:

 

  • people factors

  • material factors

  • system factors (such as policies, plans and procedures)

  • environment factors (such as workplace conditions)

  • work process factors (such as work flow design)

 

People factors – For example, what was the role of:

  • the supervision provided

  • the instructions given at the time of the incident

  • the training and experience of everyone involved

  • personal factors (such as inexperience, illness, etc.)

 

Material factors – For example, what was the role of:

  • substances and materials

  • tools, equipment and machinery

  • personal protective equipment

 

System factors – For example, what was the role of workplace:

  • safety and health policies, procedures and rules

  • budgetary allocations toward safety and health

  • training and orientation provided for workers and supervisors

 

Environment factors – For example, what was the role of:

  • weather conditions

  • workplace conditions (visibility, noise, heat, etc.)

  • the time of the day, shift or week when the incident happened

 

Work process factors – For example, what was the role of the design of:

  • the job itself

  • the work area and work flow

  • controls and safety features on equipment and machinery

 

Find the incident causes

 

Two types of causes need to be looked at; direct and indirect.

 

The direct cause(s) (what caused the incident)

 

The direct cause(s) usually occur(s) immediately before the incident. For example, a direct cause might be a collapsing jack that dropped a car onto a worker.

 

The indirect cause(s)

 

The indirect cause(s) set(s) the stage for an incident and can include:

 

  • lack of training and supervision

  • inadequate tools, equipment and materials

  • departures from safe work procedures

  • inexperience (employer/worker)

  • weaknesses in the safety management program

  • equipment design flaws

The committee and employer should try to find if there were any symptoms of a problem before the incident. If so, why were no concerns expressed? Why did the safety and health system fail?

 

Taking corrective action

 

Review what happened at each step in the incident. Prepare a report describing events and recommending corrective action. Use photos and drawings to illustrate key points.

 

  • Describe the work being done.

  • Describe the immediate (direct) cause(s) of the incident.

  • Describe the indirect cause(s).

  • Explain why the incident happened (the root cause).

  • Recommend corrective action, including both short and long-term controls, to prevent the same thing from happening again. Short-term controls should prevent a recurrence until longer-term controls can remove the fundamental causes.

  • File a copy of the report and post summaries.

The employer should take appropriate corrective action based on the report and inform the committee. Inspect the effectiveness of the corrective action.

 

INSPECTING THE WORKPLACE

 

What to inspect?

 

Four things should be inspected regularly:

  1. people

  2. vehicles, tools and equipment

  3. chemicals and biological substances

  4. the work environment.

 

The committee and employer should develop inspection schedules for each of these components.

 

People, including:

  • orientation and training

  • work practices, work rules and safety procedures

  • supervision

  • experience

 

Vehicles, tools and equipment, including:

  • machines and mobile equipment

  • production, machine-tools and related equipment

  • engines, electric motors and other power supplying equipment

  • electrical equipment, switches, circuits, etc.

  • hand tools and equipment, such as wrenches and power tools

  • personal protective equipment and clothing

  • first aid stations and emergency equipment, such as eye wash stations

  • fire protection and emergency response devices, such as fire extinguishers and water supplies

  • walkways, ramps, docks, parking lots, roadways, etc.

  • elevators, hoists and lifts

  • storage sheds and areas

 

Chemicals and biological substances, including:

  • products controlled under the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS)

  • biological substances

  • other materials of concern to workers

 

Work environment, including:

  • illumination

  • dust, fumes and vapours

  • work area design

  • light

  • hot and cold conditions

 

Inspection Procedures

 

The local workplace safety and health representative and the school/building administrator with the school/building custodian(s) shall conduct two formal inspections annually.

 

The formal inspections are generally required to be completed by the last school day in October (i.e., on or before Oct. 31) and by the last school day in April (i.e., on or before April 30) of any school year.

 

The result of this inspection shall be recorded on the Checklist for Workplace Safety & Health Inspections and forwarded to and reviewed by the workplace safety and health committee employee co-chairperson, who in turn will liaise directly with the safety and health officer and/or the director of maintenance.

 

Follow-up inspections will take place, as required, to ensure all deficiencies noted are reasonably and practicably addressed.

 

The school/building administrator should deal with routine maintenance issues that appear during the site inspection in conjunction with the maintenance department (i.e., custodial staff).

 

Where a safety or health concern is identified, the appropriate supervisor shall attempt to remedy, resolve or mitigate the matter immediately, as far as reasonable and practicable in the circumstances, in consultation with members of the site team.

 

Unsafe conditions that cannot be dealt with at the building level must be recorded and reported on the divisional Checklist for Workplace Safety & Health Inspections. A copy of said form shall be returned to the originator, indicating action taken, if any. Site representatives will keep records of all workplace safety and health concerns.

 

Where a satisfactory resolution is not achieved, the matter shall be placed on the agenda of the next meeting of the committee for the purpose of resolving the concern.

 

If the concern is not resolved in committee, either the employees or employer or both jointly may request assistance from the Workplace Safety and Health Division of Manitoba Labour and Immigration.

 

The Safety Inspection Checklist form is available for download on the staff portal and workplace safety website.

 

Dealing with Provincial Workplace Safety and Health Department Inspectors

 

During the Inspection

 

  • Meet the inspector in a professional manner and ask for the purpose of the visit. The inspector should indicate that it is either a routine inspection or an inspection for cause.

 

  • Call the Safety and Health Officer @ 204.471.5693 to notify of the visit.

 

  • The site safety team should accompany the inspector during the investigation and record the inspector's observations, comments, tests, measurements, sketches, and photographs. Note all activities of the inspector.

 

  • The safety and health officer will assist with the note-taking for the inspection, if available to do so.

 

  • Co-operate with the inspector, but when in doubt call or defer to the safety and health officer.

 

  • Any person being questioned by an inspector has the right to have counsel present and the right to remain silent.

 

  • Do not make statements of any kind unless you know it to be fact. If you are not sure about the answer to an inspector's question, state that you do not know for sure.

 

  • Refrain from bringing up grievances not subject to the inspection. Use internal safety concern reporting mechanisms to address these issues outside of an inspector's visit.

 

  • Always be truthful. Never attempt to obstruct or mislead an inspector.

 

  • Ensure inspectors wear the appropriate personal protective equipment when in areas that require personal protective equipment to be worn.

 

  • Accept all reports, tickets, orders, without comment.

 

Following the Inspection

 

  • Ensure all notes, tickets, orders, police reports are forwarded to the administrator, and then to the safety and health officer.

 

  • Administrators, along with the site safety team, should promptly develop an action and corrective action plan to address issues documented in the inspection. The safety and health officer must be involved in this process.

 

  • The safety and health officer will document and handle all reports on compliance with the workplace safety and health division.

 

  • Complete and implement all corrective action plans in a timely manner, through to compliance issued by the workplace safety and health division.

 

COMMUNICATION

 

A combination of hard-copy postings, distributions and electronic posting will be used to communicate safety and health program information within RETSD.

 

TRAINING

 

All stakeholders shall be trained to their required level of involvement in the WSHMS to become familiar with its structure, organization, and how to look up and access information both electronically and in hard copy form through:

 

  • New employee orientation, employee manuals or employment information packages

 

  • Return to work or remedial programs, as required on an individual basis

 

  • Planned ongoing training through team meetings, individual coaching or other methods as developed or adopted

 

IMPLEMENTATION AND MONITORING

 

Ultimately, the superintendent shall be responsible for the sustainability of the WSHMS, and shall enforce compliance to standards at a divisional level.

 

Workplace safety and health management system compliance shall be managed through the application of performance management and progressive discipline policies and procedures.

 

Worker failure to comply with provisions of the RETSD safety program may lead to discipline, up to and including discharge from employment and / or other remedies available at law.


REFERENCES


Manitoba Workplace Safety and Health Act or equivalent legislation as applicable

 

Manitoba Workplace Safety and Health Regulation or equivalent legislation as applicable

 

Manitoba Workplace Safety and Health Regulation Part 02 – General Duties

 

Manitoba Workplace Safety and Health Regulation Part 03 – Workplace Safety and Health Committees and Representatives

 

Manitoba Workplace Safety and Health Program Element 01 – Safety Policy and Management Commitment

 

Manitoba Workplace Safety and Health Workplace Safety Program Committee Manual (RETSD Safety Committee Terms of Reference)

 

All other associated and applicable workplace safety and health management system documents




 Document Control

A. System
RETSD Quality Management System
B. System ID
​QMS-000005
C. Sector
​Workplace Safety and Health Management System
D. Sector ID
​WSHMS-01-SOP-001-05
E. Domain
​Public
F. Repository
​Divisional SharePoint Website
G. Audience
​All Staff
H. Status
​Current
I. Title:
Safety Committee Team Member Handbook
J. Format
​HTML
K. Type
​Safe Operating Procedure
L. Tags

M. Origin
​2010-08-31
N. Reviewed

O. Revised
P. Owner
​Manager, Workplace Safety and Health and Administrative Services
Q. Owner Email
​safetyofficer@retsd.mb.ca
R. Primary Approval
​Divisional  Workplace Safety and Health Committee
S. Department Approval
​Director of Human Resources
T. Senior Administration  Approval
​Assistant Superintendent - Human Resources 
U. Board Approval
​GBG Workplace Safety and Health
V. Notes

W. Scheduled Review

X. File Address
Y. User Defined 1

Z. User Defined 2